2016 - 2017

spring / summer

vladimir cacala homes

Welcome to the latest edition of our Celebrating Heritage series, a collaboration between Working Style and some of New Zealand's finest architecture.

This season we're appreciating all the angles at two beautiful examples of 20th century modernism from groundbreaking architect Vladimir Cacala. A consciously bold departure from tradition, both these minimalist Auckland houses encapsulate simplification. Cutting through unnecessary intricacies achieves something purer, cleaner and more enduring.

It's an attitude we most definitely aspire to with our collections at Working Style, as we strive to combine the classic with the contemporary for a look that both defies and defines the era in which they are created.

Vladimir Cacala

1926 - 2007

Contemporary Modernist is very much the motif of the season here at Working Style. Acknowledging the best of the past, while embracing a bold new future.

Spring/Summer bursts into life with garments crafted with the human form in mind. They're designed to flex and move, to liberate rather than restrict as the outlook heats up.

Exposed construction shows off the beautifully trimmed seams and interiors of our jackets. The cut of the garments are in harmony with the human form and get better the more they are worn. Lighter, open tailoring maximises airflow to help you keep your cool throughout summer.

Contemporary Modernist is very much the motif of the season here at Working Style. Acknowledging the best of the past, while embracing a bold new future.

Spring/Summer bursts into life with garments crafted with the human form in mind. They're designed to flex and move, to liberate rather than restrict as the outlook heats up.

Modernism -
Form and Function

Described as the single most important philosophy of the 20th century, Modernism changed the face of design forever, across almost every sphere of human existence.

Contemporary Modernist is very much the motif of the season here at Working Style. Acknowledging the best of the past, while embracing a bold new future.

Spring/Summer bursts into life with garments crafted with the human form in mind. They're designed to flex and move, to liberate rather than restrict as the outlook heats up.

Here in New Zealand too, by the 1940s and 1950s, the new influence was making its mark on the architectural landscape. A post World War Two European influx gave us Henry Kulka, Ernst Plischke, Fred Newman. Soon to be followed by a young Czech emigre called Vladimir Cacala who had his own individual outlook on modern design.

MODERNISM

Form Follows Function.

Simplicity, clarity and the elimination of unnecessary detail.

Visual emphasis on vertical and horizontal lines.

Truth to materials, displaying construction instead of concealing it.

Cacala Family Home

When Vladimir designed what was to be his dream family home, he had already designed the house next door. The site sat on a long farmland road running down towards the Orakei basin. Vladimir liked the location so much that he bought the land and built what was to become a testament to his love for his family.

A wonder of clean lines and open spaces the house is remembered by the Cacala family as a permanent entertaining home and a 'magical place to grow up.' Vladimir employed an open door policy as natural as the indoor/outdoor flow, encouraging an atmosphere of love, friendship and happiness for all.

He also put this policy to good use - employing the muscle of his daughters male friends and other guests to dig the swimming pool so desired by his wife, Maree.

Vladimir lived here until his death in 2007. He loved it so much he never wanted to be anywhere else.

The Tapper House

An icon of modernist Auckland houses, the Tapper House is still considered by many to be one of the top 20 New Zealand homes.

Its style is a trademark of Vladimir's modernist design; a flat roof, large expanses of glass, minimal ornamentation and an open floor plan.

Some of Vladimir's contemporaries criticized him for adhering to overseas models of design. Yet there is something intrinsically Kiwi about this distinctive four-bedroom home with its locally-sourced stone walls and weather-board cladding.

The Architect

Vladimir Cacala

Born 1926 in Prague into a furniture manufacturing family, as a young boy Vladimir Cacala was perfectly placed to absorb the new modernist ideology sweeping Europe. Bauhaus was a particular influence.

However, war soon saw his homeland occupied, the family firm taken over by the State and his family forcibly split up.

By 1950, Vladimir found himself following his father to the southern hemisphere, settling at first in Melbourne before moving to Auckland to join Brenner Associates.

Exposed construction shows off the beautifully trimmed seams and interiors of our jackets. The cut of the garments are in harmony with the human form and get better the more they are worn. Lighter, open tailoring maximises airflow to help you keep your cool throughout summer.

Vladimir Cacala left soon after to start his own practice with Walter Leu. As well as high design, high profile residential projects, the company also specialised in multi-unit developments, and many of their apartment block projects are still in use across Auckland to this day.

Photography By Mark Smith